CFP: Medica sessions on epidemic disease

The Society for Healing in the Middle Ages is seeking proposals for papers for two sessions to be held at the 51st International Congress on Medieval Studies in Kalamazoo, Michigan from May 12-15, 2016. The sessions are:

1) Epidemic Diseases: Medieval Witnesses
This session will seek to expand the historical understanding of the physical, political, economic, and cultural impact of epidemic diseases in the Middle Ages by ensuring critical examination not only of the Black Death, but also other prevalent epidemic disease, such as sweating sickness, smallpox, epidemic diseases in animals, etc. Papers that present research on epidemic disease in the Middle Ages that goes beyond the usual sources (Boccaccio), to make use of such sources as documentary accounts, chronicles, household and monastic texts and records, religious texts, literary texts, and artistic representations will be especially welcome. Interdisciplinary studies are also encouraged.

2) Epidemic Diseases in the Middle Ages: Twenty-first Century Understandings
Twenty-first century scientific research has opened new doors for understanding the expansive epidemiological concerns of medieval epidemic diseases. For example, recent work in genetics, molecular microbiology, and archaeological research have offered new insight into the spread of Yersinia pestis on a global scale in history. Papers for this session would consider the numerous ways in which humanistic analysis (the work of historians and literary scholars) can seek to build upon and interpret the new scientific findings as we continue to consider the history of epidemic diseases. This session also invites discussion of methodologies for applying modern scientific research, such as osteoarcheological and biomolecular investigations, to future lines of inquiry into the study of medieval medical history.

If interested, please submit an abstract of roughly 250-300 words along with a Participant Information Form (PIF), which can be found at http://www.wmich.edu/medieval/congress/submissions/index.html#PIF. All proposal materials are due by September 15, 2015.

If you have questions about either of the sessions, or would like to submit an abstract, please direct emails to Harry York at why@pdx.edu.

Ouidad Hamitri

Doctorante en Histoire Médiévale à l’Université Lyon 2 et membre du CIHAM, elle travaille sur la chirurgie en Al-Andalus (Xe-XVe s.)

More Posts

CFP: Before/After Constantinus Africanus – Medicine in the Beneventan Zone and Beyond

The 51st International Congress on Medieval Studies, May 12-15, 2016.

A coalescence of several factors –increased access to manuscripts because of digitization projects, new interest in the history of medicine and health, and a widened perspective on western Europe’s ties to the Mediterranean and beyond– have brought new attention to the work and activities of Constantinus Africanus (d. ante 1098/99), the first known translator to render Arabic medical literature into Latin. Coming from North Africa, he eventually settled at the monastery of Monte Cassino under the famed abbot Desiderius (d. 1087). Despite the unquestionable impact of his work, much remains to be investigated about the texts he produced and the larger revolution in western medicine he facilitated. Thinking about Constantine in terms of the « Beneventan zone » focuses our attention on three key issues.

1) What was happening in medicine in southern Italy even before Constantine arrived? Increasing evidence suggests that Monte Cassino was already a buzzing center of medical activity: older medical texts were being dusted off, edited, and newly copied. Compendia of pharmaceutical recipes were being compiled. In some cases, they were being crafted into new works that employed alphabetical or head-to-toe schemas to create new order. Several texts were being translated from Greek into Latin. What prompted all this activity? Why this new attention to older manuscripts and texts?

2) What did Constantine bring with him from North Africa, not only in terms of his books or his learning, but also of the culture of the Islamicate world? Constantine’s arrival in Salerno ca. 1077 coincided with the Normans’ continuing campaign to retake Muslim Sicily. Incursions into North Africa itself would follow later. One of the striking ways in which Constantine transformed western medicine was in bringing into the pharmacopeia a much larger array of items of *materia medica* widely used in the Islamicate world but which were still unknown in the Latin world. Indeed, for his medicine to function, there had to have been a considerable transformation of the medicinal products sold in local shops. In other words, Constantine did not simply translate Arabic medicine into Latin. He contributed to an already expanding Latin medical corpus, vocabulary, and pharmacopeia by making essential participation in new international markets of drugs.

3) Intriguingly, the script being used for these medical books also shows a point of inflection. There was a mini-explosion of new copying of medical texts in the middle decades of the 11th century, mostly in Beneventan, and mostly using local Beneventan exemplars as sources. But already during Constantine’s lifetime (and even Desiderius’s lifetime), we see increasing use of Caroline. In fact, only a handful of the nearly 30 texts associated with Constantinus have survived in Beneventan copies. Why? Certainly, the past several decades of Beneventan studies have shown that that script was more often used for certain kinds of texts and registers of writing, particularly liturgy. But medicine had not been excluded before, and we see under Desiderius’ reign the production of some of the largest medical compendia in Beneventan that we know of. Did Beneventan’s status change? Or was there a perception of a new, larger « market » for medical texts, one where the local script of the old Lombard duchy would no longer do?

These two sessions will thus focus on medicine as a mode of communication and activity that connected the Beneventan zone both with its neighboring Muslim and Greek regions, but also with the rest of Latin Europe north of Rome. Papers will be welcome that connect any of these themes, but particularly those that focus on how script and book production help us pinpoint the particular, radical transformations in medicine in this period.

If interested, please submit an abstract of roughly 250-300 words along with a Participant Information Form (PIF), which can be found at http://www.wmich.edu/medieval/congress/submissions/index.html#PIF

All proposal materials are due by September 15, 2015.

Send proposals or inquiries to:
Richard Gyug
Fordham Univ.
Dept. of History
441 E. Fordham Rd.
Bronx, NY 10458
Phone: 718-817-3933
gyug@fordham.edu

Ouidad Hamitri

Doctorante en Histoire Médiévale à l’Université Lyon 2 et membre du CIHAM, elle travaille sur la chirurgie en Al-Andalus (Xe-XVe s.)

More Posts

Call for Papers : Medieval Landscapes of Disease

50th International Congress of Medieval Studies
Western Michigan University
Kalamazoo, MI — May 14-17, 2015

In recognition that diseases are manifestations of their environment, this session seeks papers that place medieval diseases within their environmental context. Just as a seed must be placed in good soil to grow, infectious disease requires a permissive environment to develop into an epidemic (or epizootic) and an ideal environment to bloom into a pandemic or panzootic. I am open to all manner of studies and disciplines that address these issues.

Examples of acceptable topics:

  • Historic impacts of epidemics and/or epizootics
  • Endemic disease in medieval environments
  • Environmental causes of disease such as malnutrition or industrial pollution related disease
  • Health effects of human-animal interactions
  • Archaeological assessments of human health and disease
  • Landscape alterations intended to improve human or animal health
  • Ecology of the built environment

Abstracts of no more than 300 words and the Participant Information Form should be sent to Michelle Ziegler at ZieglerM@slu.edu by September 15. Pre-submission queries are welcome.

The Participant Information Form and additional information be found at http://www.wmich.edu/medieval/congress/submissions/index.html.

Ouidad Hamitri

Doctorante en Histoire Médiévale à l’Université Lyon 2 et membre du CIHAM, elle travaille sur la chirurgie en Al-Andalus (Xe-XVe s.)

More Posts

CFP Earth, Air, Water & Fire sessions at Kzoo 2016

ENFORMA would like to announce that we have received four (!) sessions for the 2016 Kalamazoo International Congress on Medieval Studies (12-15 May 2016). We are looking for presenters from across the spectrum of medieval studies for sessions organized around the medieval elements: Earth, Air, Water, and Fire.

Hopefully each session will involve cross- and trans-disciplinary connections. This elemental organization encourages both a focus on medieval understandings of the world (rather than just modern ecological ones) and a creative re-arranging of some of the traditional ways of grouping sessions. For example, a paper on medieval water management could now productively share session space with a paper on medieval religious ideas about water as a purifying agent. So in addition to environmental historians, we invite religious scholars, literary scholars, art historians, and others who are actively connecting their own work to that of the increasingly deep and relevant field of medieval environmental history to propose papers.

ENFORMA and the environmental history sessions have a long history at the Medieval Congress, and a presence that is increasingly visible and valuable. In 2013 our two sessions each had over 40 people in attendance (standing room only!). Eager to encourage a wider conversation about how environmental history matters to medieval studies, we are not pre-filling sessions, and open them to all interested parties. Information on the requirements for application will be available through the International Congress website (http://wmich.edu/medieval/congress/).

Contact Ellen Arnold (Ohio Wesleyan University) directly at efarnold@owu.edu with questions and proposals. Proposals are due to Ellen no later than 15 September 2015.

Ouidad Hamitri

Doctorante en Histoire Médiévale à l’Université Lyon 2 et membre du CIHAM, elle travaille sur la chirurgie en Al-Andalus (Xe-XVe s.)

More Posts

International Medieval Congress 2016 Call for Papers

Call for Papers/Sessions – International Medieval Congress 2016

The IMC seeks to provide an interdisciplinary forum for the discussion of all aspects of Medieval Studies. Paper and session proposals on any topic related to the European Middle Ages are welcome. However, every year, the IMC chooses a special thematic strand which – for 2016 – is ‘Food, Feast & Famine’. The theme has been chosen for the crucial importance of both phenomena in social and intellectual discourse, both medieval and modern, as well as their impact on many aspects of the human experience.

Food is both a necessity and a marker of economic and social privilege. Who cooks food, who consumes it in the Middle Ages? How and what did people from different social levels or religious commitments eat? How did eating change? How were these issues contested and represented? What does food reveal about differing aspects of medieval society and culture?

The aim is to cover the entire spectrum of famine to feast through multi-disciplinary approaches. Study of the medieval economy raises issues about standards of living and nutritional health. Both archaeological as well as textual evidence have been used to explore crop yields, agricultural methods, transport problems, dearth, and famine. Geographical and social variations in diet are important for understanding medieval taste and the era’s definitions of sufficiency and luxury. Food is an expression of international relations and trade, as shown in the intercultural influences between Christian Europe and Islamic Spain, North Africa, the Eastern Mediterranean, and India.

Across medieval Europe the acquisition, preservation, and storage of food was a struggle for much of the population, but food consumption was also a means for a clerical and noble elite to display taste and ostentation. In popular culture, feasting is perceived as one of the major activities of the medieval elite. The religious significance of food and fasting in the Middle Ages was part of Christian, Muslim, and Jewish practice. Fasting and food had wide-ranging interconnections with piety and charity, and could involve renunciation of an exceptional intensity. Spiritual and physical nourishment and its absence can be explored in many disciplines from the theological, legal, and literary to the art historical and linguistic.

Areas of discussion could include:

Agricultural systems
Almsgiving – food as charity
Changing tastes
Cookbooks and cooking practice
Dearth and famine
Drink – wine, ale, and water
Environmental contexts
Feasting
Food and social class
Food in monastic and other religious communities
Food production
Food supply and population
Food supply and transport
Fresh and saltwater fish
Hunting
Medical ideas of food, digestion, and humoral pathology
Medieval haute cuisine
Religious and spiritual feasting and fasting
Spices and other edible luxury trade items
Standards of living
Symbolic/Figurative food
Trading food

The Special Thematic Strand ‘Food, Feast & Famine’ will be co-ordinated by Paul Freedman (Department of History, Yale University).

https://www.leeds.ac.uk/ims/imc/imc2016_call.html

Ouidad Hamitri

Doctorante en Histoire Médiévale à l’Université Lyon 2 et membre du CIHAM, elle travaille sur la chirurgie en Al-Andalus (Xe-XVe s.)

More Posts

Cfp for ‘The Qur’an: Text, Society And Culture’

CALL FOR PAPERS: NINTH SOAS CONFERENCE ON THE QUR’AN

‘The Qur’an: Text, Society And Culture’ Conference
Thursday 11 – Saturday 13 February 2016
SOAS, University of London
Convenors: Prof. M.A.S. Abdel Haleem and Dr Helen Blatherwick

Deadline for abstracts: 18 September 2015

Proposals are invited for the Ninth SOAS Conference on the Qur’an, to be held from Thursday 11 to Saturday 13 February 2016. The conference series seeks to provide a forum for investigating the basic question: how is the Qur’anic text read and interpreted? Our objective is to encompass a global vision of current research trends, and to stimulate discussion, debate and research on all aspects of the Qur’anic text and its interpretation and translation.

While the conference will remain committed to the textual study of the Qur’an and the religious, intellectual and artistic activity that developed around it and drew on it, contributions on all topics relevant to Qur’anic studies are welcomed and attention will also be given to literary, cultural, politico-sociological and anthropological studies relating to the Qur’an. The final conference programme will take account of the range of proposals actually accepted.

Selected papers will be published as articles in the Journal of Qur’anic Studies, subject to standard outside refereeing. Speakers are expected to give priority to JQS when publishing these articles.

Submission of Abstracts:
The deadline for abstracts is Friday 18 September 2015. Abstracts of up to 400 words and a short bio (of up to 200 words) should be submitted in Word format by email attachment to quran.conference@soas.ac.uk.

The primary conference language is English, but papers may be presented in English or Arabic. All applicants will be notified of the status of their proposals on 8 October 2015.

Presented papers should be 25 minutes long, and will be followed by 5 minutes for questions per paper.

Further Information:
It is Centre of Islamic Studies policy to reimburse featured speakers for their standard travel expenses, hotel accommodation and board. We do, however, encourage speakers to try to obtain some funding from their home universities or other sources wherever possible.

If you would like further information on the conference series, please visit the conference webpages at http://www.soas.ac.uk/quran-2016/. This will be updated with the provisional conference programme from end October 2015, on an ongoing basis.

For general enquiries, please contact the conference administrator at quran.conference@soas.ac.uk.
For academic enquiries only, please contact Helen Blatherwick at hb20@soas.ac.uk.

No registration is required for this conference and all are welcome to attend.

Venue: Brunei Gallery, SOAS, University of London, Russell Square, Thornhaugh Street, London WC1H 0XG

Ouidad Hamitri

Doctorante en Histoire Médiévale à l’Université Lyon 2 et membre du CIHAM, elle travaille sur la chirurgie en Al-Andalus (Xe-XVe s.)

More Posts

Parution : Le corps dans l’espace islamique médiéval

1114Annales islamologiques 48.1

Sous la direction de Pauline Koetschet et Abbès Zouache
Le numéro 48 est scindé en deux volumes. Le présent volume intitulé « Le corps dans l’espace islamique médiéval », a été dirigé par Pauline Koetschet et Abbès Zouache. Son introduction et ses quatorze articles dressent un large panorama de l’histoire du corps dans l’espace islamique médiéval.

Le corps devient progressivement un objet d’étude à part entière, pour des historiens désormais conscients de l’impérieuse nécessité de dialoguer avec les spécialistes d’autres disciplines. Ces études constituent autant de jalons vers la constitution d’un champ de recherche, pour l’instant encore largement à défricher. Le corps dans l’espace islamique médiéval fait figure de puzzle dont les morceaux commencent tout juste à être rassemblés et dont l’agencement nécessite le croisement des approches et des méthodes.

Ce dossier a été élaboré dans la perspective d’envisager le corps comme un objet relevant de l’histoire sociale et de l’histoire des représentations. Pour y parvenir, les auteurs ont croisé les disciplines (histoire, philosophie, littérature, anthropologie et histoire de l’art) et fait du corps un fil d’Ariane destiné à les guider dans la compréhension de sociétés aux mécanismes oubliés.

KOETSCHET (Pauline), ZOUACHE (Abbès) p. 3-10
Introduction. De chair et de sang. Le corps, un signe à l’épreuve

RICHARDSON (Kristina) p. 13-30
Blue and Green Eyes in the Islamicate Middle Ages

KATZ (Marion Holmes) p. 31-54
Fattening Up in Fourteenth-Century Cairo. Ibn al-Ḥāǧǧ and the Many meanings of Overeating

VON HEES (Syrinx) p. 55-76
Descriptions of the Body in Biographies and Their Social Meanings. Al-Ṣafadī’s Use of “Handsome Figure” in Describing his Contemporaries

SAKKAL (Aya) p. 79-102
La représentation du héros des Maqāmāt d’al-Ḥarīrī dans les trois premiers manuscrits illustrés (XIIIe siècle)

FOULON (Brigitte) p. 103-134
Le corps du poète dans la poésie arabe médiévale, d’après l’œuvre d’Ibn Ḫafāǧa (m. 533/1139)

CAIOZZO (Anna) p. 135-158
Le sang du héros. Les imaginaires du corps héroïque dans l’épopée des rois de Perse, d’après les manuscrits enluminés du XVe siècle (époques timouride et turkmène)

ALI (Ghazoan) p. 161-184
Pleasures of the Body. Theological and Philosophical Deliberations

BALDA-TILLIER (Monica) p. 185-202
Parler d’amour sans mot dire : les stigmates de la passion

CECERE (Giuseppe) p. 203-236
Santé et sainteté. Dimensions physiologiques de la vie morale et spirituelle chez Ibn ʿAṭā’ Allāh al-Iskandarī (m. 709/1309)

SELOVE (Emily), BATTEN (Rosalind) p. 239-262
Making Men and Women. Arabic Commentaries on the Gynaecological Hippocratic Aphorisms in Context

CLÉMENT (François) p. 263-278
Tableaux d’anatomie judiciaire. Législation du talion en Occident musulman et autres atteintes légales à l’intégrité physique du corps

KOETSCHET (Pauline) p. 279-300
Disséquer l’âme. L’intégrité du corps chez les médecins arabes des IXe et Xe siècles

ZOUACHE (Abbès) p. 301-344
Corps en guerre au Proche-Orient (fin Ve-VIIe/XIe-XIIIe siècle). La mort – Les cadavres

Ouidad Hamitri

Doctorante en Histoire Médiévale à l’Université Lyon 2 et membre du CIHAM, elle travaille sur la chirurgie en Al-Andalus (Xe-XVe s.)

More Posts

Call for Papers : « The Animal Turn in Medieval Health Studies », International Medieval Congress, University of Leeds, July 2016

Session details

The history of medieval medicine has somewhat neglected the position of the animal in studying the health landscape of what was effectively a multi-species society which relied on animals for food, commerce and agriculture. Animals were critical to the success of medieval society and their health was of significant concern. Medieval people lived in close quarters with their animals and the interaction of animals and humans had significant implications for the health of both groups, including famine and plague.

I am organising a session around the broad topic of ‘The Animal Turn in Medieval Health Studies’, which is seeking collaborators working in any area which touches on the intersection of animals and health. This might include the study of veterinary and medical texts, food and nutrition, magical and religious healing of animals, epizootic/epidemics, ‘healthscaping’, agriculture, animal-focused industries (such as tanning), ecocriticism, dis/ability theory and occupational health.

This session will explore the position of the animal within the wider landscape of medieval health studies. Papers might deal with the animal as patient, as foodstuff or as pharmaceutical, the animal as vector for disease or cause of human illness (poison, venom, public health concern etc.), the health implications of animal management and sale or any topic which deals with the animal as a component of human health, or the animal as the subject of health-related study.

Submission Guidelines

This session hopes to encourage an interdisciplinary discussion and as such papers will be welcomed from researchers working not just in philology, scientific and medical history, but also ecocriticism, literary studies, bioarchaeology, zooarchaeology and material culture, veterinary and biomedical science, art history, food science and nutrition. Papers from any medieval geographical area and chronological range will be welcomed.

Please send a paper title and 200-300 word abstract to Sunny Harrison at the Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds (medievalanimalhealth@gmail.com) by Friday 11th September 2015.

Conference details

The International Medieval Congress will be hosted at the University of Leeds, 3–7 July, 2016. The IMC offers ‘an interdisciplinary forum for the discussion of all aspects of Medieval Studies. Papers and sessions on any topic related to the European Middle Ages are welcome’. For more information, please see the IMC website: http://www.leeds.ac.uk/arts/info/125137/international_medieval_congress.

Ouidad Hamitri

Doctorante en Histoire Médiévale à l’Université Lyon 2 et membre du CIHAM, elle travaille sur la chirurgie en Al-Andalus (Xe-XVe s.)

More Posts

Revisiter l’histoire des sciences, des savoirs, des techniques et des arts au Moyen âge

Argumentaire
Le VIIIe colloque international sur l’histoire des sciences, des savoirs, des techniques et des arts au moyen âge se tiendra à Tunis les 3 et 4 décembre 2015.

Fidèle à sa tradition, notre laboratoire organise son colloque international biennal autour du thème du séminaire préparatoire consacré à l’histoire des sciences, des savoirs, des techniques et des arts au Moyen âge. Outre les participants au séminaire, nous nous proposons d’ouvrir le colloque à tous ceux qui, intéressés par la thématique, désirent y prendre part.

D’un constat à l’autre,

Au début du XVe siècle, Ibn Khaldûn dresse un état des lieux des sciences. Il part du constat que les sciences rationnelles sont naturelles à l’homme de par sa pensée et universellement partagées et transmises entre les civilisations, « elles sont étudiées par les adeptes de toutes les religions … Elles existent dans l’espèce humaine depuis que la civilisation est apparue dans le monde » (Muqaddima, I, p. 941.). Au sein de la civilisation islamique, les sciences ont atteint leur apogée puis commencent à s’essouffler au Maghreb tandis que l’Orient garde encore une prospérité relative qui ne durera pas longtemps. Ibn Khaldûn relève que de l’autre côté de la Méditerranée, on assiste au renouvellement de ces sciences philosophiques qui connaissent une grande prospérité «… font l’objet de traités systématiques, comptent de nombreux connaisseurs et attirent une foule d’étudiants ». (Idem, p.946)

Plus de cinq siècles plus tard, Chakib Arslan insiste sur la place des sciences dans la genèse de l’écart entre  » l’avance et le retard  » des civilisations. Le long titre de son livre paru au début des années 1930 est révélateur : Pourquoi les Musulmans ont-ils pris du retard et pourquoi les autres ont-ils pris de l’avance ?

La longue durée à temporalités variables

Passé le moment fondateur des traductions des œuvres scientifiques vers l’arabe à partir du VIIIe siècle, les sciences arabes évolueront selon de nouveaux modes et rythmes. Ces évolutions par rapport aux fondements théoriques et aux usages pratiques sont à revisiter, en tenant compte de l’optique de la dissémination des sciences arabes dans le temps et l’espace. Il serait intéressant d’établir des corrélations entre les conditions de production de la science, la demande sociale et l’offre des scientifiques pour la satisfaire. Les influences et la transmission dans la synchronie et/ou dans la diachronie permettent de déceler les relations entre les différentes aires culturelles qui prennent plusieurs formes. Florissantes en temps de paix, les sciences ne recoupent pas forcément les aléas de la politique ni les guerres ou les trêves. L’histoire des sciences a sa temporalité propre, il est opportun de la dégager comme préalable à l’étude de la naissance, du développement, des usages, et applications de telle ou telle science, avant de se pencher sur son statut et les formes de sa consécration.

Pendant le demi-millénaire qui sépare Ibn Khaldûn de Chakib Arslan, le legs scientifique arabe se transforme : une partie dépérit, des résidus par-ci, des bribes par là permettent aux sciences arabes de survivre à travers d’autres savoirs, mais sans exister par elles-mêmes.

Pour une histoire des sciences par des historiens

L’histoire de la discipline historique -mêlée à l’incompréhension ou la méfiance entre disciplines connexes- explique la rareté relative des travaux consacrés à l’histoire des sciences.

Notre colloque fait donc suite à un séminaire organisé par le laboratoire entre 2013 à 2015, sera focalisé sur l’histoire du monde arabo-islamique médiéval, à travers les sciences. Loin des polémiques idéologiques sur l’apport des sciences arabes à la longue aventure des sciences et en évitant les comparaisons anachroniques et soixante après le symposium de Bordeaux (de 1956, où les débats ont porté sur les notions de classicisme, traditionalisme opposés au renouvellement et à l’essor culturels séparés par la décadence et l’ankylose), notre rencontre se propose de faire un bilan des études et d’offrir un cadre de débat épistémologique à travers l’histoire des sciences.

Des propositions sur d’autres aires sont aussi attendues pour permettre la comparaison.

L’apport des uns et des autres n’est pas à mesurer ni à quantifier dans une perspective de surenchère, ni de compétition. Nous aspirons à une approche méthodologique qui part de la science pour aller vers d’autres sphères (la société, l’économie, la politique…) et vice versa en invitant les participants à élucider les développements des sciences durant le moyen âge, sans s’enliser « … dans les rivalités oiseuses sur la hiérarchie des civilisations, ou les lamentations sur les situations de régression et de sous-développement. » (M. Arkoun, Humanisme et islam, p. 38).

Enfin une dernière interrogation pour clore cet appel : Est-ce que la science a évolué dans deux sens opposés et strictement successifs : sept siècles glorieux, dans une ascendance vers le progrès, auxquels succèdent sept siècles de décadence ? Cette question-clé nous aidera à dégager d’autres rythmes, d’autres cadences, peut-être même une périodisation propre aux sciences.

Axes du colloque
Nous invitons les collègues à mettre l’accent plutôt sur les objets des sciences, leurs théories, les tournants et les ruptures qui ont marqué leur évolution à partir des œuvres et des institutions. Cette option, ni exclusive ni stricte, se justifie par le nombre de travaux consacrés aux savants, qu’explique l’importance de la littérature biographique et prosopographique.

Conditions d’émergence des sciences arabes et contextes historiques
Itinéraires des différentes disciplines
Modes de circulation et d’échanges (Traductions, voyages et échanges épistolaires)
Formes d’influences.
Conditions de soumission
Les langues acceptées sont l’arabe et le français.

Le formulaire de participation (en fichier attaché) est à envoyer aux adresses

lab.maim@gmail.com
khaled.kchir@fshst.rnu.tn
La date limite de soumission a été fixée au samedi 31 octobre.

Conseil scientifique
Mounira Chapoutot-Remadi,
Radhi Daghfous,
Khaled Kchir,
Aleya Bouzid,
Salah Baïzig (Université de Tunis)
Faouzi Mahfoudh (Université de La Manouba).

« Revisiter l’histoire des sciences, des savoirs, des techniques et des arts au Moyen âge », Appel à contribution, Calenda, Publié le mardi 25 août 2015,

http://calenda.org/337177

Ouidad Hamitri

Doctorante en Histoire Médiévale à l’Université Lyon 2 et membre du CIHAM, elle travaille sur la chirurgie en Al-Andalus (Xe-XVe s.)

More Posts

Medieval Landscapes of Disease

Call for Papers
Kalamazoo, MI — May 12-15, 2016
Following on a successful session last year, I’m offering another session on Medieval Landscapes of Disease this year at Kalamazoo.

In recognition that diseases are manifestations of their environment, this session seeks papers that place medieval diseases within their environmental context. Just as a seed must be placed in good soil to grow, infectious disease requires a permissive environment to develop into an epidemic (or epizootic) and an ideal environment to bloom into a pandemic or panzootic. I am open to all manner of studies and disciplines that address these issues.

Examples of acceptable topics:
Historic impacts of epidemics and/or epizootics
Endemic disease in medieval environments
Environmental causes of disease such as malnutrition or industrial pollution related disease
Health effects of human-animal interactions
Applications of the One Health Approach to medieval disease
Archaeological assessments of human health and disease
Landscape alterations intended to improve human or animal health
Ecology of the built environment

Abstracts of no more than 300 words and the Participant Information Form should be sent to Michelle Ziegler at ZieglerM@slu.edu by September 15. Pre-submission queries are welcome.

The Participant Information Form and additional information be found at http://www.wmich.edu/medieval/congress/submissions/index.html .

Ouidad Hamitri

Doctorante en Histoire Médiévale à l’Université Lyon 2 et membre du CIHAM, elle travaille sur la chirurgie en Al-Andalus (Xe-XVe s.)

More Posts

Call for Papers: Religion and Medicine

Paper proposals are invited for a conference on ‘Religion and medicine: healing the body and soul from the Middle Ages to the modern day’ that will take place at Birkbeck, University of London, 15–16 July 2016. The conference is convened by Katherine Harvey, John Henderson and Carmen Mangion.

In the contemporary Western world, religion and medicine are increasingly separated, but through much of history they have been closely interrelated. This relationship has been characterised by some conflict, but also by a great deal of cooperation. Religious perspectives have informed both the understanding of and approaches to health and sickness, whilst religious personnel have frequently been at the forefront of medical provision. Religious organisations were, moreover, often at the heart of the response to medical emergencies, and provided key healing environments, such as hospitals and pilgrimage sites.

This conference will explore the relationship between religion and medicine in the historic past, ranging over a long chronological framework and a wide geographical span. The conference’s focus will be primarily historical, and we welcome contributions which take an interdisciplinary approach to this topic.

Four main themes will provide the focus of the conference. The sub-themes are not prescriptive, but are suggested as potential subjects for consideration:

1. Healing the body and healing the soul
• Medical traditions: the non-natural environment and the ‘passions of the soul’.
• Religious traditions (for example, the Church Fathers, sermons and devotional literature).

2. The religious and medicine
• Medical knowledge and practice of religious personnel, including secular and regular clergy.
• Nurses and nursing.
• Medical practitioners, religious authorities and the regulation of medical activity and practice.

3. Religious responses
• Religious responses to epidemics, from leprosy to plague to pox and cholera.
• Medical missions in Europe and the wider world.
• Religion, humanitarianism and medical care.

4. Healing environments and religion
• Religious healing, miracles, pilgrimage.
• Institutional medical care (including hospitals, dispensaries and convalescent homes).

Proposals, consisting of a paper abstract (no more than 300 words) and a short biography (no more than 400 words), should be submitted to religionandmedicineconference@gmail.com by 30 October 2015. Proposals will be responded to by early December. For more information please visit the website, and follow on Twitter: @RelMedConf2016.

Ouidad Hamitri

Doctorante en Histoire Médiévale à l’Université Lyon 2 et membre du CIHAM, elle travaille sur la chirurgie en Al-Andalus (Xe-XVe s.)

More Posts

CALL FOR PAPERS: Sacred Spaces and Political Places: Fostering Regional Identities through Historical and Literary Medieval Pilgrimage I and II

The 51st International Congress on Medieval Studies

Kalamazoo, Michigan

May 12 – 15 2016

Among the many factors impelling medieval pilgrimage, these sessions seek to examine those elements which fostered regional identity. The dedication of pilgrims traveling varying distances to experience the divine at sacred destinations was simultaneously enhanced by patrons who promoted traffic to and maintained pilgrimage sites. Saints’ shrines, tombs, and holy relics reinforced cultural and social identities relevant to the geographical and religious characteristics of a given locale and they helped shape and strengthen the prevailing political landscapes.
These two panels call for papers which closely examine Muslim and/or Christian medieval texts, both literary and historical, which foster regional identity through their promotive character as they call attention to medieval sites of pilgrimage, relics, and/or the history of saints. By engaging in this dialogue through a cross-cultural lens, we not only aim to evaluate the common characteristics of shrine visitation and rituals in the Middle Ages but also their disparities in both Islamic and Christian literary and historical disciplines. We welcome papers which analyze several genres of medieval texts such as romances, chronicles, hagiographies, guidebooks, and travelogues to explore this topic. We urge papers to consider how textual accounts of pilgrimage and pilgrimage sites relate to practical experience, how the translation and distribution of relics affected centers of power in a region, or how legends associated with specific saints contribute to the understanding of a particular locale.
Please send in your abstract of no more than 300 words to Laura Clark (l_clark@baylor.edu) and Ali Alibhai (alibhai@fas.harvard.edu) by September 15th 2015. Panelists will be informed in early October 2015 regarding their acceptance in the panels.

Ouidad Hamitri

Doctorante en Histoire Médiévale à l’Université Lyon 2 et membre du CIHAM, elle travaille sur la chirurgie en Al-Andalus (Xe-XVe s.)

More Posts

Formation ED 483 – « Visa pour la thèse »

« Cher.e.s doctorant.e.s de l’ED 483,

Nous vous proposons cette année encore de participer au séminaire de formation « Visa pour la thèse – le doctorat côté pratique(s) » qui se déroulera entre octobre et décembre 2015. Ce séminaire s’adresse à tous les doctorants de l’ED 483 et propose de revenir en 6 séances sur les différents aspects pratiques et réflexifs d’un parcours de thèse en sciences sociales, en bref sur tout ce que vous avez rêvé de savoir pour être un doctorant épanoui ! La participation à toutes les séances vous permet de valider 20 heures de formation auprès de l’école doctorale. Vous trouverez ci-joint un programme synthétique du séminaire, la version complète et définitive du programme sera très bientôt mis en ligne sur le site de l’Ecole doctorale.

Vous pouvez donc commencer à vous inscrire dès le 1er septembre prochain en nous écrivant à l’adresse suivante : doctorat.cote.pratiques@gmail.com. Le nombre de participants étant limité, les 35 premiers candidats seront informés de la validation de leur inscription, par retour de mail, à partir du 20 septembre.

Nous restons à votre disposition pour toute information complémentaire et vous souhaitons à toutes et à tous une excellente rentrée !

L’équipe du séminaire »

VISA POUR LA THESE_annonce_inscription

Ouidad Hamitri

Doctorante en Histoire Médiévale à l’Université Lyon 2 et membre du CIHAM, elle travaille sur la chirurgie en Al-Andalus (Xe-XVe s.)

More Posts